Tips For Avoiding Back Injuries at A Desk Job

main stretching backSitting at a desk all day while on the job may not seem like a risk for acquiring a back injury. The truth is that it’s not just those who work at physically demanding jobs who end up with bulging discs and spinal stenosis. Even typing on a computer for hours by its sedentary nature can put you at risk for back troubles. Here are a few tips for avoiding back pain if you sit most of the day at a desk.

Learn Proper Sitting Posture: If your back, ears, shoulders, and hips aren’t properly aligned, you may experience back strain. Sit with these body parts evenly lined up and be sure you keep your feet flat on the floor and not crossed over one another. You can either sit back in your chair this way or move forward to the chair’s edge; as long as you stay aligned and don’t slouch.

Move Around: It’s important not to just stay in your chair for hours at a time. Get up every 30 minutes. Get a cup of coffee, visit the restroom, or just walk in a circle around the office. The important thing is to change it up every so often and prevent slumping in your chair.

Look Over Your Workspace: Make sure your desk chair is at the right height so you can use your keyboard without hunching over your shoulders. The computer monitor should be at eye level and right in front of you so you don’t have to turn your neck. The same is true of the distance of the monitor from your body. If it’s too far away, you may be stretching your neck to see it, which is not good. Move everything you use regularly on your desk to within comfortable reaching distance so you can maintain your posture. You’ll want to adjust your chair, the computer monitor, the telephone, and whatever else you need nearby to do your job.

Have The Correct Equipment: If you know your back isn’t feeling comfortable in the chair you have, you may need more back support. Perhaps your feet aren’t properly aligned and you need a small footstool. If your monitor is too low for your eye level, it may need to be raised. Whatever your situation is, make you get the right equipment to lessen your risk for back injuries. Speak with someone in your human resources department to see if the items you need are already available. If not, ask for help in obtaining what you need to do your job well and cut down on doctor and insurance costs in the long run.

Suffering from back and neck pain can occur, even at a desk job. If you are suffering from chronic pain, call Dr. Solomon Kamson, MD, PhD, at the Spine Institute Northwest today to schedule your consultation. Dr. Kamson will be able to accurately diagnose your issues and provide you with alternative solutions that are minimally invasive in nature. Contact the Spine Institute Northwest in Bothell, WA, at 206-496-0630 for more information.

How a Microdisectomy Can Get You Up to Speed Again

golf back painAfter professional golfer Tiger Woods underwent a minimally invasive microdisectomy in 2014 for a pinched nerve near his spinal cord, he was back on the golf course a few months later to play in the Quicken Loans National in Bethesda, Maryland.

Tiger Woods had been in constant agony prior to undergoing this surgery, one that is often performed by Dr. Solomon Kamson, MD, PhD, at the Spine Institute Northwest. Woods could no longer perform normal, everyday activities, leading him to get advice from other athletes, such as Tony Romo of the Dallas Cowboys, who had successfully undergone an endoscopically-assisted procedure for a herniated disc.

If you are suffering from numbness, weakness, and/or pain in your back or leg, you may be a candidate for a minimally invasive microdisectomy. A pinched nerve is also commonly referred to as a herniated disc. When you have a herniated disc, as Tiger Woods did, your pain may begin in the spine and then radiate down one or both of your legs. You can also experience a decrease of feeling in your leg, have tingling sensations, or feel weakness in your muscles. After getting up from a prone position, your pain may become worsened.

Dr. Kamson may advise patients who are experiencing this type of pain from a herniated disc to undergo a minimally invasive procedure called a microdisectomy. This procedure is often performed when your pain is stemming from nerve damage in the lumbar spine. The microdisectomy takes the pressure off the nerves in this area to relieve your pain.

During a microdisectomy, Dr. Sol Kamson will use an endoscope guided by a needle and Laser and Radiofrequency (RF) technology to repair the bulging disc from inside your body with just a small incision necessary to insert the scope. Tiny amounts of soft tissue and bone that are compressing the nerve and causing pain are extracted during the procedure. The entire surgery takes about 90 minutes for each vertebrae level being worked on. Although most patients opt for local anesthesia for this minimally invasive procedure, general anesthesia is needed for cervical decompression surgery.

For active patients who participate in sports regularly and are dealing with spinal and other sports-related issues, the Sports Medicine Clinic at the Spine Institute Northwest in Bothell, WA, also offers patients innovative treatment options. Contact Dr. Kamson today to schedule a consultation and learn more about how a microdisectomy can get you back in the game.